Monthly Archives: August 2016

How to Bermuda, Part 1

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View from Gibbs Lighthouse

“You took da bus?” cried our hostess in her endearing accent. “All da way from da airport?” She said it like she had never heard of any tourist doing something so complicated.

Traveling well requires a good bit of creativity. Or money. Often both. But creativity can kick in to help you save money, learn more about a local culture, and help you have a much better trip. You can also have some fun surprising locals with your cunning.

Bermuda, one of the havens of the super-rich, proved on our recent visit to require ample creative problem solving in lieu of shelling out for exorbitant taxi rides and restaurant meals. I gathered that, because many of the tourists were either so rich they didn’t care what the taxis cost or had arrived on cruise ships with prearranged island tours, we remaining DIY-ers  had to fend for ourselves. We learned a lot about Bermuda through pure scrappiness, and I am proud now to share with you what we learned.

  1. WHY BERMUDA…
    My parents honeymooned in Bermuda and always described it as paradise with pink beaches. This proved fully accurate. The water is so clear that you can see rainbow-colored fish straight through the cresting waves. Rocky outcroppings along the southern shore make for secluded swimming grottoes so picturesque it hurts. Bermuda is a world-class destination for golf, sailing, and scuba diving, and offers many other activities including cave swimming, kayaking, and renting mopeds. Located in the middle of the Atlantic at a similar latitude level to North Carolina, it is decidedly not Caribbean, and for much of the year has significantly cooler temperatures (averaging around 75-80 in the summer). It is a quick flight from East Coast cities (less than two hours) and we found the best deal from New York’s JFK. The Bermudian dollar is fixed to the value of the American dollar, and the currency is interchangeable, so easy peasy. All told, Bermuda makes for a seriously nifty getaway.

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    Jobson Cove

  2. BEFORE YOU GO…
    One of the most important things to know about Bermuda is that it is very expensive to be there. Almost all of the country’s GDP comes out of off-shore banking, which means they produce virtually nothing of their own and import everything they need. This means you will be paying $17 for a sandwich, $30 for an entree, and $7 for a loaf of bread. This shouldn’t turn you off to visiting, but you need to be aware. My husband and I made it work on a budget by cooking breakfast and one other meal in our apartment rental, and then sharing an appetizer and an entree at a restaurant for the remaining meal. Another way to ease your wallet pain would be to bring non-perishable and non-produce snacks from home like pretzels, trail mix, etc. along with refillable water bottles (the water is safe to drink).

    In planning our itinerary, I was surprised to find few guidebooks, and even fewer recent guidebooks, available for our type of traveler. The Fodors I perused proved a waste of time; no way was I going to believe that the cheapest accommodation ran north of $300 nightly. I’m also not into birding or shopping and wasn’t planning on playing golf this time around. Given this, I spent my prep hours looking at TripAdvisor reviews for activities, taking notes on the nicest beaches, the prettiest nature preserves, and must-see historical landmarks. In the next installment, I will cover top attractions.

  3. LODGING…
    Finding lodging on a budget was no easy feat, especially in high season. Originally I set out to find a hotel to benefit from amenities like airport shuttles and pools, but ultimately suffered from sticker shock, feeling frustrated by the thought of spending more than $200/night on decrepit rooms desperately in need of refurbishing. Bermuda, however, is full of alternative lodging options including B&Bs and apartment/house rentals. We had good luck with VRBO, finding several solid choices in our preferred price range. Our first VRBO inquiry led to even better luck because, though that particular unit was not available, the property manager sent us back a list of available units that were even CHEAPER AND NICER than the one we had wanted! The company was Bermuda Accommodations Inc., and I can recommend them highly. We booked a small apartment with a fully outfitted kitchenette, a king size bed, a huge bath tub, AC, and charming hosts, all walking distance from the nicest beaches on the island.

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    Marley Beach, our favorite

    This leads me to location. Much of the island’s attractions are spread out across the island which means you will be doing some commuting between them. This will be slow going. The speed limit is only 25 mph, though it actually feels fast on those narrow, windy roads—believe me. At this pace, the two main villages, Hamilton and St. George, are about a half-hour apart. The nicest beaches are 20 minutes south of Hamilton. The Dockyards are about 45 minutes away from everything. This said, it is important to choose your lodging to be closest to the features you will use most often. If you want to be near the nicest beaches, then stay along the south coast in Warwick Parish. If you want to be closer to multiple public transit routes, restaurants, and night life, stay closer to Hamilton. If you want old-world charm, shopping options, and access to Tobacco Bay, stay in St. George.

  4. WHEN YOU GET THERE…
    Your plane will soar over waters that grow increasingly turquoise the nearer you get to landing. You will step out of the airport and breathe in the salty, sunny air. Then you will realize there was no information booth in the airport. Customs just dumped you onto the curb to be accosted by taxi drivers. No maps, no guidance, no functional pay phones. We went around asking employees for tips and eventually figured out the buses.

    From the airport, you have several options to reach your lodging. The first is to have arranged it ahead of time if your lodging offers shuttle service. The second is to pay for a taxi. This might be the easiest option, but depending on where you are located, be prepared to spend, especially if you get in on a Sunday when they charge 25% more on fees. The third is to take the bus. There are several buses that pick up in front of the airport and go either to St. George or Hamilton. Reference where you’re staying on this bus map and pick your route. You will need to pay in cash until you can get other bus tickets. They do not give change, so have some coins ready to pay exact fare. If you are transferring to a second bus, ask the driver to give you a transfer slip, and he or she will tear off a piece of paper noting the time. Remember that the pink poles at the bus stops lead you toward Hamilton, and the blue poles lead you away from it. NOTE: Depending on how crowded the bus is, the driver may not let you on with luggage. We were told they rarely enforce this, but there are between 0-1 luggage racks on these buses, and some bus rides are packed full.

    You can buy bus passes and individual tickets at the bus terminals, ferry terminals, and information booths. These tickets also work on ferries. They offer multi-day passes as well as packets of tickets. Probably the best way to save money was to estimate the number of trips you will be taking and buy a packet of 15 All-zone tickets. This way the tickets can be used by whomever (whereas the passes can only be used by one person at a time) and you save a bunch of money by buying in bulk. Just remember to ask for those transfers!

    Stay tuned for Part 2, Top Bermuda Activities!

 

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Filed under Inspiration and Creativity, Life is good and here's why, Photography, Running Commentary on whatever tickles the fancy, Travel

A New Edible Video!

I recently completed another video project for Edible Nashville Magazine, this time featuring The Grilled Cheeserie’s chef, Crystal De Luna-Bogan as she prepares her favorite way to eat watermelon–with chopped mint and a hibiscus lime granita. This dreamy fruit salad was the perfect treat for a sticky summer Saturday, and I had fun capturing the process on film. Check out EdibleNashville.com/recipes to make it yourself, and enjoy the video!

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My Latest Video Project: Behind the Scenes at The Cookery

It all started when this Australian man gave me free dessert.

Josh and I arrived at The Cookery two winters ago just after Christmas to find the doors locked. As we were walking away, an Aussie named Brett beckoned us back and made sure we didn’t go away empty handed. (The cake was AMAZING, by the way). This little God moment turned into a huge blessing for me as I have since been entrusted with telling The Cookery’s story twice, first for Edible Nashville Magazine, and now in the video below.

It has been an honor sharing the stories and communicating the vision of the remarkable eatery and ministry that is The Cookery. This unassuming cafe nestled on 12 South in the Edgehill neighborhood of Nashville is so much more than it seems. Inside formerly homeless men are getting a second chance at life. They live in community that is safe, their needs are met, and they go to work each day to learn the culinary arts, a trade that will enable them to once again become self-sufficient. It is a place of miracles. Watch and see.


 

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How Learning Improv Improves Your Life

Yes-And.jpgLast week I experienced my first foray into improvisational comedy. The meetup I help facilitate, Design Thinking Nashville, hosted an improv workshop and welcomed an instructor from LOL Nashville to teach us some basics of the comedy craft. The taste I got was definitely enough to make me want to keep going.

Why care about improv? Improv techniques are growing increasingly popular in business spheres as they provide much needed creative thrust. They train the brain to overcome inhibitions, to react quickly and fluidly to change, and to work well with others. Even just playing improv games for an hour made me feel invigorated, empowered, and less judgmental of myself and others. I left wishing I had something major and difficult to tackle that day; my brain was ready for anything.

There were three main takeaways from this experience. I hope they encourage you to think differently and maybe try out an improv class of your own!

  1. YES, AND…
    Improv and Design Thinking both operate on the principle that groups develop better ideas through what improv artists call the “Yes, And…” approach. This means accepting one person’s ideas and building on it collaboratively as a group. Does that mean you need to think it was a perfect idea? Not at all. It means that you are opening your mind to exploring possibilities. Nothing is held sacred, but neither is anything outright denounced. The alternative approach, with which many of us are infinitely more familiar, is to squash ideas the instant a fault is found. This crushes morale, reinforces hierarchical divisions within a group, and infringes on the potential for reaching better ideas by engaging openly in the process. Improv comedians must respond with “Yes, And…” to what ever gets thrown at them. There is no time to edit, no opportunity to critique. And who wants to watch that anyway? It is all about the fluid exchange of ideas, and this applies directly into any collaborative challenge, on stage or otherwise. My friend Tony said that the “Yes, And…”exercises revolutionized the make-believe he plays with his young daughter. It restrains him from questioning the premise of the imaginative play and instead go with the flow, which not only leads to better ideas but is also way more fun.
  2.  ESTABLISH RELATIONSHIP
    One of the games we played involved an interesting caveat: we had, within the exchange of three statements, to establish a specific relationship between two people in a scene. It was a tricky thing to do, coming up not only with something to say but enough of a backstory for the audience to guess at a likely relationship between the two characters in front of them. Extrapolating from this exercise makes me think about how important it is to consider backstories and contexts when we engage in collaborative work. Where is my coworker coming from with this idea? How might this idea work with our audience even if I don’t agree with it? What was the train of thought that led to this idea? This quick imaginative exercise frames problem solving such that we keep sight of the context and consider solutions from multiple angles.
  3. CONFIDENCE AND VULNERABILITY
    One of the paradoxes of the universe is that we humans (many of us, anyway) spend a lot of time and energy trying to avoid embarrassment when simultaneously admiring most the people willing to make fools of themselves. There is an emotional and interpersonal intelligence we associate with people confident enough to exhibit occasional silliness. Improv lessons are a great reminder of this truth because you get to see people liberated from their usual inhibiting boundaries of decorum. I watched, and was among, people making outlandish noises while wiggling about, and we are all totally accepting of our mutual vulnerabilities. The environment was safe enough for us all to participate and, what’s more, emerge with both more confidence in ourselves and more respect for the other participants. Imagine a work environment safe enough for people to explore ideas beyond their inhibition—this is a leadership goal worthy of serious attention.

 

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Edible Video!

No, not edible video–a video for Edible Nashville, silly!

For those of you in the area, Edible Nashville puts on cooking demos every other week at the Nashville Farmers Market. A few weeks back I filmed the event and put together this little video compiling Chef Jesse Goldstein’s best tips for his marinated cucumber and peach salad. Check it out!

For readers of this creativity blog, this video posed several interesting creative challenges. To begin with, it was the first video we produced to accompany our print and web content, so style and feel had not been determined. This meant trial and error work, asking questions and reshaping the content until it “clicked.” Questions included ‘Should there be audio?’ and ‘what is the best pace for this video?’ and, most importantly, ‘what is going to make this video most valuable for viewers?’

I also had to deal with the challenges of collecting footage I didn’t know how to use and using footage I couldn’t change. This is where more experienced videographers and storytellers have the edge: they learn over time which images and messages they need to collect in order to make things work. Even so, there is always a serendipitous element to live shoots, and there much that can never be anticipated. No matter what, editorial work ends up depending on a healthy dose of creativity to see footage for the many ways in which they can be used. For instance, you might have opened with a strong shot, but then realized it would serve better in the middle or as a closing shot. Or there could be a shot that looks really good, but doesn’t advance the message of the video, and you hear your writing teacher’s voice in your head…kill your darlings. Or there could be a shot that has a flaw, but you notice that you can snip here and stretch here and actually turn it into the missing link to complete your mini film.

In short, this video project combined an interesting balance of big picture thinking and detail attention. Because of this, I find that analyzing creative process can be very helpful to asking the right questions. What is your creative process like? What questions are you asking in your work? Do share!

 

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